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To support and help strengthen the work of advocates and organizers, the Hub is committed to providing and uplifting up-to-date research, reports, data, model policies, toolkits and other resources. We do this by searching for, categorizing, and making available existing resources from partner organizations and others working on issues related to policing. When needed, the Hub also produces its own research in collaboration with partners. This resource database is categorized, easy to search, and regularly updated by our research team.

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Resources that appear on the Community Resource Hub website are not necessarily supported or endorsed by the Hub. The resources that appear represent various different policies, toolkits, and data that have been presented to challenge issues relevant to safety, policing, and accountability.

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Cameras in the Classroom: Facial Recognition Technology in Schools

Claire Galligan, Hannah Rosenfeld, Molly Kleinman, & Shobita Parthasarathy (University of Michigan)

Facial Recognition can be used to identify people in photos, videos, and in real time, and is usually framed as more efficient and accurate than other forms of identity verification. Schools have also begun to use it to track students and visitors for a range of uses, from automating attendance to school security. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that it will erode individual privacy and disproportionately burden people of color, women, people with disabilities, and trans and gender non-conforming people. In this report, authors focus on the use of Facial Recognition in schools because it is not yet widespread and because it will impact particularly vulnerable populations. On the basis of this analysis, the authors strongly recommend that use of Facial Recognition be banned in schools. They have also offered some recommendations for its development, deployment, and regulation if schools proceed to use the technology.

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Police Fired/Rehired

Washington Post

Since 2006, the nation’s largest police departments have fired at least 1,881 officers for misconduct that betrayed the public’s trust, from cheating on overtime to unjustified shootings. But The Washington Post has found that departments have been forced to reinstate more than 450 officers after appeals required by union contracts.

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The NYPD Files: Search Thousands of Civilian Complaints Against New York City Police Officers

ProPublica

After New York state repealed a law that kept police disciplinary records secret, ProPublica sought records from the civilian board that investigates complaints by the public about New York City police officers. The board provided us with the closed cases of every active-duty police officer who had at least one substantiated allegation against them. The records span decades, from September 1985 to January 2020. We have created a database of complaints that can be searched by name or browsed by precinct or nature of the allegations.

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Policing Women: Race and gender disparities in police stops, searches, and use of force

Prison Policy Initiative

Jails have been described as the criminal justice system’s “front door,” but jail incarceration typically begins with the police, with an arrest. Before any bail hearing, pretrial detention, prosecution, or sentencing, there is contact with the police. But despite their crucial role in the process, we know less about these police encounters than other stages of the criminal justice system. This report analyzes gender and racial disparities in traffic and street stops, including arrests, searches, and use of force that occurs during stops.

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Ten Key Facts About Policing: Highlights From Our Work

Prison Policy Initiative

Many of the worst features of mass incarceration — such as racial disparities in prisons — can be traced back to policing. Prison Policy Initiative (PPI) research on the policies that impact justice-involved and incarcerated people therefore often intersects with policing issues. Now, at a time when police practices, budgets, and roles in society are at the center of the national conversation about criminal justice, PPI has compiled key work related to policing (and discussions of other researchers’ work) in one briefing.

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Atlas of Surveillance: Documenting Police Tech in Our Communities

Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF)

A database containing several thousand data points on over 3,000 city and local police departments and sheriffs’ offices nationwide, allows citizens, journalists, and academics to review details about the technologies police are deploying, and provides a resource to check what devices and systems have been purchased locally. Built using crowdsourcing and data journalism over the last 18 months, the Atlas of Surveillance documents the alarming increase in the use of unchecked high-tech tools that collect biometric records, photos, and videos of people in their communities, locate and track them via their cell phones, and purport to predict where crimes will be committed.

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Does Race Matter for Police Use of Force? Evidence from 911 Calls

Mark Hoekstra & CarlyWill Sloan (Texas A&M University)

A research report that examines 911 call data, civilian race, and officer use of force. Researchers found that white officers increase use of force as they are dispatched to more minority neighborhoods, compared to minority officers. Researchers also found that while white and Black officers use gun force at similar rates in white and racially mixed neighborhoods, white officers are five times as likely to use gun force in predominantly Black neighborhoods. Similarly, white officers increase use of any force much more than minority officers when dispatched to more minority neighborhoods.

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Strengthening the Demand: “Defund the Wealthy” – Cops & Capitalism Summer Webinar Series

Action Center on Race & the Economy

People around the U.S. are demanding that cities defund their local police departments. This webinar encourages us to take that demand one step further, and highlights the relationships between corporations and policing. We know that cutting the police budget is a first step towards the world we want to see but in order to fully fund our communities and invest in the things we need we must also redirect funding from the institutions that support policing.

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Research Briefing: Police Brutality Bonds – Cops & Capitalism Summer Webinar Series

Action Center on Race & the Economy

This webinar explores ACRE’s groundbreaking research on cities’ use of Police Brutality Bonds, the bonds issued to pay for police brutality settlements. Police brutality bonds generate fees for Wall Street firms like Bank of America and Goldman Sachs, and interest payments for investors, allowing them to literally profit from police violence. Borrowing can also drastically increase the costs of police violence, but these costs are not reflected in the official police budget. The webinar covers how ACRE did the research for the report, how bonds work, some of ACRE’s data sources and what other policing costs might be hiding in city budgets.

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