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The Community Resource Hub for Safety & Accountability works to ensure all people have access to resources and tools to advocate for systems change and accountability in law enforcement.

Latest Resources from the Hub

Cops Don’t Stop Violence: Combating Narratives Used to Defend Police Instead of Defunding Them

Community Resource Hub for Safety & Accountability + Interrupting Criminalization

Police are facing one of the greatest crises of legitimacy in a generation. In the wake of the largest uprisings in U.S. history, sparked by police violence, bloated police budgets, and the deadly impacts of a failure to invest in community health and safety laid bare by the pandemic, pro-police forces are on the defensive. So they are reaching for one of their most reliable weapons — fear.

This is nothing new — cops and policymakers have always used fearmongering to push “law and order” agendas and pour more and more money into police departments. Now, with police budgets under scrutiny by campaigns to defund the police and refund our communities all across the country, lawmakers and the media are once again recycling old talking points about increasing violence and crime, claiming that campaigns to defund police are responsible.

Read our new report to explore data, talking points, and narratives that highlight the fact that COPS DON’T STOP VIOLENCE.

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Health and Safety for Young Migrants: Recommendations for Supporting Unaccompanied Youth

Human Impact Partners

Human Impact Partners joined with the Dignity Not Detention Coalition to create a resource outlining recommendations for what healthy, just, and supportive immigration policy can look like for unaccompanied youth immigrating to the US, without relying on detention or detention-like facilities.

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Reimagining Traffic Safety

Community Resource Hub for Safety & Accountability

This memo explores visions, promises, and challenges surrounding efforts to remove police from traffic safety administration and management and proposes several approaches to begin rethinking traffic safety. Options include redesigning roads to make it more difficult to engage in speeding and other traffic offenses, developing alternative entities responsible for traffic safety, and developing alternative responses to traffic-related crises that do not involve the criminal legal system. Developing new approaches to traffic safety can benefit public safety on the roads while removing the deep and historic harms of police-involved traffic enforcement.

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Police-Free Schools

National Juvenile Justice Network

This report profiles several jurisdictions that recently removed police from their schools and detail how communities were able to wage successful campaigns and the types of resources schools have implemented in place of law enforcement.

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Civilian Oversight of Law Enforcement: Report on the State of the Field and Effective Oversight Practices

National Association of Civilian Oversight of Law Enforcement

In 2016, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) awarded a Community Policing Development (CPD) grant to the National Association for Civilian Oversight of Law Enforcement (NACOLE). NACOLE sought to provide comprehensive guidance on civilian oversight for oversight practitioners, law enforcement, community organizations, and local officials in order to further develop effective civilian oversight throughout the United States. With support and funding from the COPS Office, NACOLE has developed nine in-depth case studies of civilian oversight agencies throughout the United States; a searchable, online database of civilian oversight agencies and their characteristics; and a report on the state of the field and effective practices.

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Abolition Week

Scalawag Magazine

As the national media is shifting its attention away from demands to restructure, defund, and abolish the police, Scalawag’s Abolition Week is an appeal to keep these conversations at the forefront. This week, we’re only publishing work by or about incarcerated writers, artists, and thinkers in an effort to center their experiences and their humanity.

Whether you’ve never heard of abolition, have questions about what it means, or are already deeply committed to the work—the journey toward abolition is an ongoing process, and it’s one that we are all on together. This journey involves both changing our systems and our personal mentalities.

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