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To support and help strengthen the work of advocates and organizers, the Hub is committed to providing and uplifting up-to-date research, reports, data, model policies, toolkits and other resources. We do this by searching for, categorizing, and making available existing resources from partner organizations and others working on issues related to policing. When needed, the Hub also produces its own research in collaboration with partners. This resource database is categorized, easy to search, and regularly updated by our research team.

If you would like to suggest a resource to be included in our database, please submit it here.

Resources that appear on the Community Resource Hub website are not necessarily supported or endorsed by the Hub. The resources that appear represent various different policies, toolkits, and data that have been presented to challenge issues relevant to safety, policing, and accountability.

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Showing 703 Resources

Building Safe, Thriving Communities: Research-Based Strategies for Public Safety

NYU School of Law Center on Race, Inequality, and the Law

This report examines the way our criminal legal systems have driven up incarceration rates, disproportionately harmed communities of color, and failed to provide true public safety. Specifically, we analyze sentencing and incarceration policies and law enforcement practices, including those in policing and prosecution, that have created systems of control but failed to treat underlying challenges. The report then lays out a new path for public safety that looks to the comprehensive, research-based strategies in policing, prosecution, and sentencing that elected and appointed leaders are using to move away from harsh carceral practices and respond to social and economic needs. These reforms illuminate a new vision of public safety that reduces our reliance on systems of enforcement and control while relying instead on research, collaboration, and community engagement—not incarceration—to build and support communities.

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From Warriors to Guardians, Race Shapes Police Masculinity

The Gender Policy Report – University of Minnesota

Contrast the wanton police killings of Breonna Taylor and George Floyd with police officers’ embrace of an armed 17-year-old named Kyle Rittenhouse. Or the heavily policed Black Lives Matter protests versus police selfies with the January 6 Capitol Hill mob. Or the police seizure of guns from African Americans in front of whites rallying while openly armed.

The last year is replete with striking examples of a racist double standard in policing. It is a broken record that keeps playing—seemingly louder every year—throughout American history. It tells a story that is tragically familiar: police disproportionately disrespect, harass, abuse, intimidate, brutalize, and kill people of color as compared to whites.

But to understand this longstanding thread in American society requires understanding not just the politics of race but also the politics of gender—and how, through their interlocking, Blackness is criminalized and whiteness is disproportionately treated with impunity.

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Confronting Crime and Criminalization: Race, Gender and Policing in Minneapolis

The Gender Policy Report – University of Minnesota

In the 16 months since police officers murdered George Perry Floyd Jr. in Minneapolis, grassroots activists and community members have spurred an ongoing global conversation about racialized police violence. Recent surveys by the American Public Media Research Lab and our research team indicate that Black residents (and other residents of color) in Minnesota hold higher levels of distrust towards police, experience higher levels of police discrimination, and believe police are more likely to target racial and ethnic minorities than white residents. In response, grassroots organizers and local leaders have proposed a range of recommendations to address police violence, from defunding—or altogether abolishing—the Minneapolis Police Department, to more modest reforms such as banning chokeholds and misconduct training.

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Predictive Policing Explained

Brennan Center for Justice

Police departments in some of the largest U.S. cities have been experimenting with predictive policing as a way to forecast criminal activity. Predictive policing uses computer systems to analyze large sets of data, including historical crime data, to help decide where to deploy police or to identify individuals who are purportedly more likely to commit or be a victim of a crime.

Proponents argue that predictive policing can help predict crimes more accurately and effectively than traditional police methods. However, critics have raised concerns about transparency and accountability. Additionally, while big data companies claim that their technologies can help remove bias from police decision-making, algorithms relying on historical data risk reproducing those very biases.

Predictive policing is just one of a number of ways police departments in the United States have incorporated big data methods into their work in the last two decades. Others include adopting surveillance technologies such as facial recognition and social media monitoring. These developments have not always been accompanied by adequate safeguards.

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Louisville, KY: Toolkit for Confronting FOP Power via Contract Process

The 490 Project

This kit is designed to help you participate in the effort to remove dangerous provisions from the Collective Bargaining Agreements (CBA) between Louisville Metro & Louisville’s Fraternal Order of Police (FOP). This document outlines key moments in the coming weeks & months and provides you with the information you need to participate in these activities. Many of the resources here are templates that you can adapt for your own purposes.

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Whose Security is it Anyway?: A Toolkit to Address Institutional Violence in Nonprofit Organizations

Project NIA

Institutional violence within community centers, healthcare organizations, and social services, in concert with the “helping” industry’s increasing collusion with and reliance on law enforcement, fuels the prison pipeline. In response to pervasive institutional violence and increasing policing, surveillance, and targeting of queer and TGNB (trans and gender non-binary) youth of color, street-based youth, and youth experiencing homelessness, Project NIA created a toolkit to share strategies of resistance to the increased securitization of non-profit spaces.

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A Look at Police Violence Against Black Women and Queer People

The Takeaway

Amid all of the issues that exist in coverage and legal accountability when it comes to cases of police violence against Black people, separate hurdles remain when it comes to acknowledging the stories of Black women and queer people killed by the police. State violence against Black women, femmes, and queer folk is rarely at the center of mass mobilization and media attention. That’s despite the fact that Black women are overrepresented among the people shot and killed by the police. And also, the reality that transgender people are more than thee times as likely to experience police violence as cisgender people.

The Takeaway speaks with Andrea Ritchie, a co-founder of Interrupting Criminalization, an initiative that aims to end the criminalization of women and LGBTQ people of color. She’s also the author of “Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color.”

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Evidencia la Violencia

Kilometro 0

Evidencia la violencia is a documentation tool to collect testimonies and stories in which police or public safety agents intervene in a violent, discriminatory or excessive way with the citizens. We collect these stories and data through interviews with affected people, their families or witnesses to the interventions, as well as press releases or stories on social networks. The documentation we collect feeds our database, a tool for community participation, search for accountability and public advocacy against State violence.

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Biking Where Black: Connecting Transportation Planning and Infrastructure to Disproportionate Policing

Jesus M. Barajas – Department of Environmental Science and Policy, University of California, Davis

This study asks whether deficiencies in transportation are associated with disproportionate policing in Chicago using the case of cycling. The author examines how the number of bicycle citations issued per street segment are influenced by the availability of bicycle facilities and street characteristics, controlling for crash incidence, police presence, and neighborhood characteristics. Infrastructure inequities compound the effects of racially-biased policing in the context of transportation safety strategies. Remedies include the removal of traffic enforcement from safe systems strategies and equitable investment in cycling.

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