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To support and help strengthen the work of advocates and organizers, the Hub is committed to providing and uplifting up-to-date research, reports, data, model policies, toolkits and other resources. We do this by searching for, categorizing, and making available existing resources from partner organizations and others working on issues related to policing. When needed, the Hub also produces its own research in collaboration with partners. This resource database is categorized, easy to search, and regularly updated by our research team.

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Resources that appear on the Community Resource Hub website are not necessarily supported or endorsed by the Hub. The resources that appear represent various different policies, toolkits, and data that have been presented to challenge issues relevant to safety, policing, and accountability.

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Showing 55 Resources Women × Clear All

Two Sides of Justice: Curriculum & Audio Stories

Project NIA

Two Sides of Justice is a collection of narratives from system survivors. The criminal justice system has altered the lives of the people whose stories you are about to hear, sometimes for the better but more often for the worse. This curriculum resource was created by educator & long-time Project NIA volunteer Santera Matthews for educators and organizers who would like to use the stories to start or extend discussions about harm, violence and criminalization in their communities. This work is part of the Building Accountable Communities Project (BAC) spearheaded by Project NIA. The curriculum was designed by Rachel Hoffman.

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#SayHerName YouTube Playlist

African American Policy Forum

YouTube has partnered with AAPF and Executive Director Kimberlé Crenshaw to elevate the stories of Black women, girls, and femmes who have been stolen by state-sanctioned violence and racial injustice. Know their names. Hear their stories. We stand in solidarity against violence toward Black women and girls.

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Is Sex Work Decriminalization the Answer? What the Research Tells Us

ACLU

This research brief reviews existing empirical research on the impacts of decriminalization — and conversely criminalization — of sex work to inform recommendations for policy and practice. The ACLU has a history of supporting the decriminalization of sex work, but as efforts for U.S. legislative reform at the local, state, and federal level grow, examining the potential impacts of proposed policies is critical. Developed in consultation with local affiliates and sex worker organizers, this Brief provides an assessment of the growing evidence base on the potential benefits and harms of the decriminalization of consensual sex work (including buyer-only criminalization and full criminalization) and concludes with specific recommendations for policymakers, law enforcement, advocates, and researchers.

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The Special Report: Black Girls & Women & Police Brutality

The Special Report with Areva Martin

Areva is joined by Andrea Ritchie, Breaion King, Michelle Jacobs, Shalonda Jones, Dr. Thalia González and Dr. Treva Lindsey. Why are Black girls and women abused by police invisible? These experts say its deeper than race.

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Punishing the Poorest: How the Criminalization of Homelessness Perpetuates Poverty in San Francisco

Coalition on Homelessness – San Francisco

This 2015 report details the effects of criminalization on the homeless residents of San Francisco. Since 1981, San Francisco has passed more local measures to criminalize sleeping, sitting, or panhandling in public spaces than any other city in the state of California. During this same period, the United States has experienced the greatest expansion of its jail and prison system under any democracy in history. This expansion has primarily affected the poorest members of this society. This report documents and analyzes the impacts of the rising tide of anti-homeless laws in our era of mass incarceration on those experiencing homelessness in San Francisco.

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Where (To Learn): Resource Hubs to Ponder Questions You Didn’t Even Know You Had

Collective Community Care

A collection of common questions related to abolition, policing, and incarceration and links to find resources for further education and organizing.

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Episode 270 – Angela Davis

AirGo Podcast

In this episode, Angela Davis discusses her experience this summer during uprising, the remarkable popularization of abolition, the significance of addressing gender violence and inequality in the fight for liberation, and much much more.

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Girlhood Interrupted: The Erasure of Black Girls’ Childhood

Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality

Authored by Rebecca Epstein, Jamilia J. Blake, and Thalia González, this 2017 report provides – for the first time – data showing that adults view Black girls as less innocent and more adult-like than their white peers, especially in the age range of 5-14. The report builds on similar results that have emerged from studies of adult perceptions of Black boys. In 2014, for example, research by Professor Phillip Goff and colleagues revealed that beginning at the age of 10, Black boys are more likely than their white peers to be misperceived as older, viewed as guilty of suspected crimes, and face police violence if accused of a crime.

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Defund the Police Campaign Demands & Information (Boston, MA)

Families for Justice As Healing

Families for Justice as Healing organizes to shift power and resources away from policing and incarceration and into Black and Brown communities to address systemic and racist abandonment, disinvestment, and criminalization. Residents are demanding healthcare, housing, treatment, education, arts, culture, community centers, community-led programming, and economic development through employment and cooperative business ownership. Families for Justice as Healing demands systemic change to policing in Boston, toward our long-term goal of removing police from our communities. Police are the first point of contact with the criminal legal system for our members, and the reason women and our families wind up on jail and prison bunks. While we are organizing against the most harmful policing practices and fighting to shift resources from policing into our communities – we are also doing the work to create ways of preventing, responding to, and healing from harm without police and prisons.

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