Your Saved Resources Close

  • Saved resources will appear here

Resources

COVID-19: For more up-to-date information on policing responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, check out our News section.

To support and help strengthen the work of advocates and organizers, the Hub is committed to providing and uplifting up-to-date research, reports, data, model policies, toolkits and other resources. We do this by searching for, categorizing, and making available existing resources from partner organizations and others working on issues related to policing. When needed, the Hub also produces its own research in collaboration with partners. This resource database is categorized, easy to search, and regularly updated by our research team.

If you would like to suggest a resource to be included in our database, please submit it here.

Resources that appear on the Community Resource Hub website are not necessarily supported or endorsed by the Hub. The resources that appear represent various different policies, toolkits, and data that have been presented to challenge issues relevant to safety, policing, and accountability.

Submit Your Resources

Filter Resources

Filter by Topic

Filter by Type

Showing 116 Resources School Policing and Youth × Clear All

Police-Free Schools Frequently Asked Questions (Canada)

Police-Free Schools Winnipeg

While school divisions claim to have received positive feedback on police in schools from staff and students, it’s important to understand how policing targets marginalized groups. The prejudicial practices of police unevenly impact the student body and community. For this reason, a vote of confidence from those least affected by policing is meaningless. This FAQ page outlines responses from a survey that intends to center the voices of those directly impacted by police profiling and violence.

View Resource

Black & Blue: Art About Policing Violence & Resistance

Project NIA

Project NIA believes strongly in the value and importance of creative resistance. We use art (in its various forms) to communicate with a broad array of individuals about the injustice of the prison industrial complex. To that end, we invited artists (youth & adults) to contribute prints and posters relating to policing, violence, and resistance. We are thrilled to be able to exhibit art created by Sarah Atlas, students from Bowen High School, Billy Dee, Eric Garcia, Leigh Klonsky, LuchArte, Eva Nagao, Mauricio Pineda, Ariel Springfield and Stephanie Weiner.

View Resource

Police in Schools and Student Arrest Rates across the United States: Examining Differences by Race, Ethnicity, and Gender

Emily M. Homer & Benjamin W. Fisher (University of Louisville, Kentucky)

Implementing police in schools is a common strategy for ensuring school safety, but it is unknown whether, to what extent, and for whom the presence of police in schools affects student arrest rates. Utilizing nationwide data from the 2013-2014 Civil Rights Data Collection, this study examines how police presence is related to student arrest rates, and whether this association varies by student race/ethnicity and gender. Data shows that the association between police presence and arrest rates was stronger for all the groups examined in schools with police, particularly for Black students and boys. This provides support for criminalization theories suggesting that police presence results in more arrests.

View Resource

Final Report on the Community Safety Review Process (Brattleboro, VT)

Shea Witzberger & Emily Megas-Russell, LICSW

This report is a review of the community safety process in Brattleboro, Vermont. This community safety review process sought to understand the current state of the community safety systems in Brattleboro and their impact on community members’ actual experiences of safety, danger, or harm. The process was led by two core facilitators and informed and guided by a nine-member committee, who each brought their own identities, perspectives and lived experiences. From October through December, this team sought input from community members about their experiences with safety, danger, harm and safety response systems. All community members were welcomed to share their experiences and visions, and engagement efforts were focused on connecting with individuals who carry marginalized identities and who are most impacted by policing and police-like systems. We heard from over 200 community members and professionals working in over 25 organizations. We also performed a quality review of the Brattleboro Police Department policies, practices, and some areas of data collection. The Town of Brattleboro has embarked on a courageous and imperative process of evaluating community experiences with safety, danger, harm and policing/safety systems. This step must be followed next by action.

View Resource

[Un]warranted

CBS2 Chicago

Home is where you should feel the safest. For many Chicago families, it’s being invaded by the people worn to serve and protect them. When a confidential informant gives officers information, such as tips on crimes, police are required to verify it’s correct before acting. In the case of a search warrant, it must be signed by a police supervisor, an assistant state’s attorney and a judge. But Chicago Police officers often fail to verify the address before executing search warrants, leading to the wrong homes – and innocent families – being the targets.

This page was originally published on Oct. 6, 2019. On May 18, 2020, an epilogue was added. On July 29, 2020, the epilogue was updated with new data provided by police.

View Resource

Abolishing the Surveillance of Families: A Report on Understanding Harm, Surveillance, & Information Sharing in the Department of Children and Family Services in Los Angeles County

Stop LAPD Spying Coalition

Calls for reform suggesting the deployment of social workers instead of police in our communities overlook the past and present damage done by the child welfare system as co-conspiring with police. The primary goal of this brief is to discuss the ways the Department of Children and Family Services is interconnected with police through data sharing, predictive analytics, and direct partnership. We see this brief as just the beginning of a larger endeavor in understanding the harm of the child welfare system on children and families.

View Resource

Invest/Divest Louisville

Root Cause Research Center

This kit is designed to consolidate the information regarding Invest Divest strategy and resources for Louisville, Kentucky. This kit is intended to be used for the following: refer to this document for campaigning at the social media level, share this document with your base, and hold teach-ins and trainings on the uses of narrative and social media for this campaign, post directly from your own personal channels, and share to and from the partner organizations listed here.

View Resource

Resisting Criminalization of Reproductive Autonomy: Policy Dos and Don’ts

Interrupting Criminalization

In response to the expanding criminalization of reproductive autonomy through increasing restrictions on abortion and reproductive care, and the growing criminalization of pregnant people and parents, a group of reproductive justice and anti-criminalization organizers and advocates came together in May 2019 to develop a shared analysis and resistance strategies. This preliminary list of policies which can contribute to increased surveillance, policing, criminalization, and punishment of pregnant people, parents, and providers emerged from these conversations. This document is intended to inform policymakers and advocates concerned about reproductive justice, intimate partner and domestic violence, public health, and criminalization about the potential consequences of the policy approaches outlined below, and to offer alternative strategies that carry less risk of contributing to the criminalization of reproductive autonomy.

View Resource

Defund Police: An Animated Video

Project NIA

This is a video collaboration with Project Nia & Blue Seat Studios. This four-minute animated video is made with young people in mind but can be a useful introduction to basic #DefundPolice concepts for all ages. People have a lot of ideas about policing. And our ideas about policing are shaped by our race, our genders, our class, and our parents. Dominant culture, especially mass media sells us the image of “Officer Friendly.” But whose experience is that actually based on?

View Resource

Show more

Sign up for our weekly resource roundup