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To support and help strengthen the work of advocates and organizers, the Hub is committed to providing and uplifting up-to-date research, reports, data, model policies, toolkits and other resources. We do this by searching for, categorizing, and making available existing resources from partner organizations and others working on issues related to policing. When needed, the Hub also produces its own research in collaboration with partners. This resource database is categorized, easy to search, and regularly updated by our research team.

If you would like to suggest a resource to be included in our database, please submit it here.

Resources that appear on the Community Resource Hub website are not necessarily supported or endorsed by the Hub. The resources that appear represent various different policies, toolkits, and data that have been presented to challenge issues relevant to safety, policing, and accountability.

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Showing 79 Resources Policing of People with Mental Illness × Clear All

Who Keeps Us Safe?

Mother Jones

Two 911 calls, six years apart, reveal the perils of policing and the promise of alternatives. Learn about the role the Anti Police-Terror Project plays in creating alternative responses to police in the Oakland, California area.

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Portland Street Response: Six-Month Evaluation

Portland State Homelessness Research & Action Collaborative

Portland Street Response (PSR) is a new first responder program for non-emergency calls involving people experiencing homelessness or mental health crisis. The program launched on February 16, 2021 in the Lents neighborhood in Portland, OR and operates Monday to Friday from 10 AM to 6 PM. The pilot is coordinated by Portland Fire & Rescue (PF&R), and the founding team consists of a firefighter paramedic, a licensed mental health crisis therapist, and two community health workers. The team is dispatched from the Bureau of Emergency Communications (BOEC) when a caller reports one or more of the following and the individual has no known access to weapons and is not displaying physically combative or threatening behavior.

The mixed-methods evaluation is comprehensive, community centered, and includes feedback from a variety of stakeholders and sources, including interviews with unhoused community members and others served by Portland Street Response. This six-month program evaluation report summarizes the findings of our evaluation thus far. However, the evaluation is ongoing and will culminate in a one-year program review at the end of the pilot period in spring 2022.

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Building Safe, Thriving Communities: Research-Based Strategies for Public Safety

NYU School of Law Center on Race, Inequality, and the Law

This report examines the way our criminal legal systems have driven up incarceration rates, disproportionately harmed communities of color, and failed to provide true public safety. Specifically, we analyze sentencing and incarceration policies and law enforcement practices, including those in policing and prosecution, that have created systems of control but failed to treat underlying challenges. The report then lays out a new path for public safety that looks to the comprehensive, research-based strategies in policing, prosecution, and sentencing that elected and appointed leaders are using to move away from harsh carceral practices and respond to social and economic needs. These reforms illuminate a new vision of public safety that reduces our reliance on systems of enforcement and control while relying instead on research, collaboration, and community engagement—not incarceration—to build and support communities.

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Police in Schools: Racial Justice and True Student Safety?

American Bar Association (ABA)

The question of whether police belong in schools has been a long-debated topic in the United States. With the increased focus on policing generally, the debate has grown more intense. Proponents argue that police can more effectively address student-to-student conflict, such as bullying, and increase overall safety in an age of recurring school shootings. Those who oppose argue that police in schools contribute to the school-to-prison pipeline and result in disparities based on race and/or disability in discipline and arrests, as well as a climate of fear for students of color. Speakers on this program present the data, discuss the impact of police in schools and examine this issue critically to confront the question of whether police in schools result in enhanced student safety.

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Defund the Police – Invest in Community Care: A Guide to Alternative Mental Health Crisis Responses

Interrupting Criminalization

The primary purpose of this guide is to serve as a pragmatic tool for individuals and communities organizing and advocating for non-police mental health crisis responses, and to offer key considerations for what can be a complex, costly, and long-term intervention strategy.

This guide highlights considerations for real, meaningful shifts away from law enforcement and towards autonomous, self-determined community-based resources and responses to unmet mental health needs. It also takes into account a range of knowledge and expertise among the intended audience: community members, advocates, organizers, activists, mental health professionals, policymakers, and other change agents working towards the selection and implementation of mental health crisis responses.

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Defund. Re-Envision. Transform: City of St. Louis Fiscal Year 2022 Budget Process Toolkit

ArchCity Defenders

Defund. Re-Envision. Transform. is a grassroots campaign anchored by Action St. Louis, CAPCR, Forward Through Ferguson, and ArchCity Defenders, which demands the defunding of the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department (SLMPD), the re-envisioning public safety through reinvestment into community resources that actually keep our communities safe, and transformation of the St. Louis region.

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Defund CPD Community Conversation Toolkit

Defund CPD Campaign

The intent of this toolkit is to further the movement to #DefundCPD, and the larger movement to abolish all forms of police. Our goals are to educate and to share resources for individuals, groups, and organizations to have conversations about abolition. This toolkit grounds the conversation in real-world examples in Chicago and elsewhere, and interrogates our society’s narratives about the police. We also intend to make resources we’ve used in Chicago accessible to those around the country. We believe in a vision of dismantling toxic carceral systems, and building real systems of community safety. With education, solidarity, and collective action, we are building a world without police.

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The People’s Plan (NY)

LI United to Transform Policing and Community Safety, LI Advocates for Police Accountability, United for Justice in Policing LI

The People’s Plan is a set of public safety recommendations developed by three community-led coalitions (LI United to Transform Policing and Community Safety, LI Advocates for Police Accountability, and United for Justice in Policing LI) with the input of hundreds of Long Islanders. This comprehensive plan presents 12 proposals for structural reform to Reimagine Policing and Public Safety to ensure that LI is safe for ALL Long Islanders.

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What Happens After We Defund Police? A Brief Exploration of Alternatives to Law Enforcement

UCLA School of Law Criminal Justice Program

A brief that addresses the question: what happens after we defund police? The brief puts forth a framework for the key elements required for sustainable and meaningful change in jurisdictions that are investing in non-law enforcement responses. It also uplifts 13 different strategies and approaches that can be used as alternatives to law enforcement. In surveying the landscape of such alternatives, CJP identified numerous programs and efforts that are currently in operation and reflect a spirit of innovation, are community-led, and work to address the root causes of conflict, harm, and violence. This brief touches just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to these types of solutions.

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