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To support and help strengthen the work of advocates and organizers, the Hub is committed to providing and uplifting up-to-date research, reports, data, model policies, toolkits and other resources. We do this by searching for, categorizing, and making available existing resources from partner organizations and others working on issues related to policing. When needed, the Hub also produces its own research in collaboration with partners. This resource database is categorized, easy to search, and regularly updated by our research team.

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Resources that appear on the Community Resource Hub website are not necessarily supported or endorsed by the Hub. The resources that appear represent various different policies, toolkits, and data that have been presented to challenge issues relevant to safety, policing, and accountability.

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Showing 68 Resources LGBTQIA × Clear All

Breaking the Silence: Supporting Survivors of Police Sexual Violence

Interrupting Criminalization

Amidst a growing national conversation about sexual violence sparked by #MeToo and the ‘me, too.’ movement originated by Tarana Burke, and an ongoing national reckoning around the violence of policing, one form of sexual and police violence remains shrouded in silence: police sexual violence.

This is a curriculum for sexual assault service providers intended to accompany Interrupting Criminalization’s report Shrouded in Silence: Police Sexual Violence – What We Know and What We Can Do About It. Facilitators and participants are strongly encouraged to review the report before using any of the exercises in this curriculum.

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Shrouded in Silence – Police Sexual Violence: What We Know & What We Can Do About It

Interrupting Criminalization

In the midst of a national reckoning around the violence of policing, and a national conversation about sexual assault prompted by #MeToo and the ‘me, too.’ movement launched by Tarana Burke, sexual violence by law enforcement officers – including local and state police, ICE agents and Border Patrol, school “resource” officers, federal law enforcement agents, probation and parole officers – remains shrouded in silence. Survivors of police sexual violence are rarely heard from or discussed in either conversation, and their experiences generally do not drive organizing and advocacy in either context.

This report, in conjunction with an accompanying curriculum for sexual assault service providers, is intended to contribute to breaking this silence, to summarize what we know about sexual violence by law enforcement officers, and to offer concrete steps toward prevention of police sexual violence and increased safety, support, and opportunities for healing for survivors. For more information and a more detailed analysis of police sexual violence, see Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color (excerpts available at invisiblenomorebook.com).

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The People’s Plan (NY)

LI United to Transform Policing and Community Safety, LI Advocates for Police Accountability, United for Justice in Policing LI

The People’s Plan is a set of public safety recommendations developed by three community-led coalitions (LI United to Transform Policing and Community Safety, LI Advocates for Police Accountability, and United for Justice in Policing LI) with the input of hundreds of Long Islanders. This comprehensive plan presents 12 proposals for structural reform to Reimagine Policing and Public Safety to ensure that LI is safe for ALL Long Islanders.

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Is Sex Work Decriminalization the Answer? What the Research Tells Us

ACLU

This research brief reviews existing empirical research on the impacts of decriminalization — and conversely criminalization — of sex work to inform recommendations for policy and practice. The ACLU has a history of supporting the decriminalization of sex work, but as efforts for U.S. legislative reform at the local, state, and federal level grow, examining the potential impacts of proposed policies is critical. Developed in consultation with local affiliates and sex worker organizers, this Brief provides an assessment of the growing evidence base on the potential benefits and harms of the decriminalization of consensual sex work (including buyer-only criminalization and full criminalization) and concludes with specific recommendations for policymakers, law enforcement, advocates, and researchers.

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Where (To Learn): Resource Hubs to Ponder Questions You Didn’t Even Know You Had

Collective Community Care

A collection of common questions related to abolition, policing, and incarceration and links to find resources for further education and organizing.

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Technologies for Liberation: Toward Abolitionist Futures

Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice & Research Action Design (RAD)

This report is based on rich interviews and engagement with movement technologists, organizers, researchers, and policy advocates about what liberation from surveillance and criminalization can actually look like. Astraea and Research Action Design (RAD) created this report as a resource for funders to understand what is at stake and what opportunities exist to support critical organizing at the intersections of decriminalization and technology. Throughout this report, you will read about surveillance, carceral technologies, criminalization, and policing. In some instances, we speak about these practices in tandem, and, in others, we hone in on one to provide deeper insight, but please bear in mind that these processes and practices—and their consequences—are inextricably linked.

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#SayHerName Chime Special

Chime for Change

Historically, Black women, girls, and femmes have not fit the most accessible frames of anti-Black police violence. Consequently, it is difficult to tell stories about their lost lives that people recognize and remember. Their precarity is buried beneath myths, stereotypes, and denial. But the heartbreaking truth is that Black girls as young as 7 and women as old as 93 have been killed by the police. Explore a special zine issue highlighting the victims of police violence and an interactive webpage to learn more about the women that #SayHerName represents.

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Defund. Reinvest. Protect

Portland African American Leadership Forum (PAALF) Action Fund

In the wake of George Floyd’s murder by MPD officer Derek Chauvin, Black Portlanders, together with thousands of allies, have led uprisings all across our city. The Portland Police Bureau responded with escalated violence against our city’s grieving Black community. This is organizers’ list of demands for the city of Portland.

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2020 Janine Soleil Abolitionist Institute – Session Materials

Project NIA

This page is a hub for this year’s session materials, as well as additional resources related to the topic of PIC abolition, organizing, and healing justice. Click through for more information on the event.

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