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To support and help strengthen the work of advocates and organizers, the Hub is committed to providing and uplifting up-to-date research, reports, data, model policies, toolkits and other resources. We do this by searching for, categorizing, and making available existing resources from partner organizations and others working on issues related to policing. When needed, the Hub also produces its own research in collaboration with partners. This resource database is categorized, easy to search, and regularly updated by our research team.

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Resources that appear on the Community Resource Hub website are not necessarily supported or endorsed by the Hub. The resources that appear represent various different policies, toolkits, and data that have been presented to challenge issues relevant to safety, policing, and accountability.

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Showing 53 Resources De-Escalation × Clear All

What Happens After We Defund Police? A Brief Exploration of Alternatives to Law Enforcement

UCLA School of Law Criminal Justice Program

A brief that addresses the question: what happens after we defund police? The brief puts forth a framework for the key elements required for sustainable and meaningful change in jurisdictions that are investing in non-law enforcement responses. It also uplifts 13 different strategies and approaches that can be used as alternatives to law enforcement. In surveying the landscape of such alternatives, CJP identified numerous programs and efforts that are currently in operation and reflect a spirit of innovation, are community-led, and work to address the root causes of conflict, harm, and violence. This brief touches just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to these types of solutions.

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What Will It Take to End Police Violence? Recommendations for Reform

Communities United Against Police Brutality

May 25, 2020 was a both a personal tragedy for the Floyd family and a community tragedy. But it was also a watershed moment locally and nationally in people’s understanding of police violence, the racism and classism that underpins it, and the systems that enable it. This document seeks to provide specific recommendations for addressing police brutality, misconduct and abuse of authority in the state of Minnesota. Many of these recommendations are not new—our organization has presented them many times over the years. Prior failures by leaders at the city, county and state level to adopt these evidence-based solutions are what brought us to this place.

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Austin Justice Coalition Toolkit

Austin Justice Coalition

This toolkit is an introduction to AJC’s vision and strategy for social change. From grassroots organizing to legislative policy work, here is a snapshot of how we take on the big problems.

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Compassionate Alternate Response Team: A Community Plan for San Francisco

Compassionate Alternative Response Team (CART) San Francisco

This project asks what kind of City would be possible if unhoused neighbors were treated as worthy of life and dignity rather than as a nuisance or a threat, and if trauma-informed, unarmed civilians had been called to help rather than control. Many of us who have worked on this effort have personally witnessed and experienced the cruelty of the current system. Whether that be the tears of losing one’s property, the trauma of displacement to nowhere, or the loss of life-saving medications, these practices have led to deaths on the streets from despair, and disconnection from key medical and housing services. Compassionate Alternative Response Team (CART) imagines that it would be a safer, healthier, and more vital city for the Black and Brown people who live and spend time here, and ultimately for everyone.

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Don’t Call the Police: Community-Based Alternatives to Police in Your City

Don’t Call the Police

Founded in June 2020, dontcallthepolice.com is an online directory of local resources available as alternatives to calling the police or 911, to provide easy access to alternatives to calling the police when faced with a situation that requires de-escalation and/or intervention, not violence.

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The Reimagine Oregon Project Policy Demands

Reimagine Oregon

A group of Black-led organizations, Black individual activists and protest organizers came together to compile the proposals generated in the Urban League’s “State of Black Oregon, ”the Portland African American Leadership Forum’s “People’s Plan,” Coalition of Communities of Color’s publications “Communities of Color in Multnomah County: An Unsettling Profile” and “Leading with Race: Research Justice in Washington County,” as well as new policy demands from nightly protest organizers and organizations like Unite Oregon and PAALF Action Fund’s “Defund. Reinvest. Protect” policy platform, and Washington County Ignite’s “Reimagine” effort. They then asked elected leaders from federal, state, regional, county, and city governments one simple question, “What timeline do you commit to finally get this stuff done and who, in your jurisdiction, will lead it to the finish line?”

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What the US Would Look Like Without Police, as Imagined in 3 Scenarios

CNN

To crystallize the concept of defunding the police, CNN posed three scenarios to experts and activists in the movement and asked how they’d be handled in an America without police. The participants are Patrisse Cullors, co-founder of Black Lives Matter; Philip McHarris, a doctoral candidate in sociology and African American Studies at Yale University and lead research and policy associate at the Community Resource Hub for Safety and Accountability; and Alex Vitale, a professor of Sociology and Coordinator of the Policing and Social Justice Project at Brooklyn College and author of “The End of Policing”

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Durham Beyond Policing Coalition Proposal for a Community-Led Safety and Wellness Task Force

Durham Beyond Policing Coalition

Durham Beyond Policing Coalition developed this proposal because the draft budget for the City of Durham for 2019-20 contained a request from the DPD for 72 additional full time (FTE) officers over three years, with the first year’s cost given as $1,729,573 for an initial 25 new officers. After considerable study, we have found the rationale for DPD’s budget request is incomplete and outdated, and we object to the premise that more officers will make the people of Durham safer. This proposal offers what we feel is a more holistic approach to some of the same issues and opportunities.

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What To Do Instead of Calling the Police: A Guide, A Syllabus, A Conversation, A Process

Aaron Rose

A resource and guide that offers alternatives to policing.

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