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To support and help strengthen the work of advocates and organizers, the Hub is committed to providing and uplifting up-to-date research, reports, data, model policies, toolkits and other resources. We do this by searching for, categorizing, and making available existing resources from partner organizations and others working on issues related to policing. When needed, the Hub also produces its own research in collaboration with partners. This resource database is categorized, easy to search, and regularly updated by our research team.

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Resources that appear on the Community Resource Hub website are not necessarily supported or endorsed by the Hub. The resources that appear represent various different policies, toolkits, and data that have been presented to challenge issues relevant to safety, policing, and accountability.

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#SayHerName Chime Special

Chime for Change

Historically, Black women, girls, and femmes have not fit the most accessible frames of anti-Black police violence. Consequently, it is difficult to tell stories about their lost lives that people recognize and remember. Their precarity is buried beneath myths, stereotypes, and denial. But the heartbreaking truth is that Black girls as young as 7 and women as old as 93 have been killed by the police. Explore a special zine issue highlighting the victims of police violence and an interactive webpage to learn more about the women that #SayHerName represents.

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How To Take Back the Budget: A Guide To Reviewing and Changing the Police Budget In Your Community

Community Resource Hub for Safety & Accountability + Jared Knowles (Civilytics)

This comprehensive guide to reviewing your city or county budget will explain how to argue for changes in police staffing and funding to your local policymakers. Whether you are in a major city, a smaller town, or a rural county – this guide was written to help you take action over how public funds are raised and spent in your community. The advice in this guide is based on Jared Knowles’ experience doing in-depth budget reviews of police departments in cities and counties across the country as well as working as a budget analyst in state government.

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How Governments Pay: Lawsuits, Budgets, and Police Reform

Joanna C. Schwartz – UCLA School of Law

A report that looks into who foots the bill for law enforcement settlements and judgments in locations around the US. Findings should expand courts’ and scholars’ understandings of the impact of lawsuits on police reform efforts, inspire experimentation with budgeting arrangements that encourage more caretaking and accountability by law enforcement, and draw attention to the positive role government insurers can and do play in efforts to promote risk management and accountability in policing.

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Not Just “A Few Bad Apples”: US Police Kill Civilians at Much Higher Rates Than Other Countries

Prison Policy Initiative

There is no question that the number of police killings of civilians in the U.S. – who are disproportionately Black and other people of color – are the result of policies and practices that enable and even encourage police violence. Compared to police in other wealthy democracies, American police kill civilians at incredibly high rates.

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Nix the Six – Police Unions

Campaign Zero

Across the country, police unions have written contracts and laws that make it almost impossible to hold police accountable. We reviewed police union contracts in nearly 600 cities and “Police Bill of Rights” laws in 20 states. Learn how police unions and police Bills of Rights create obstacles and how they look in your state.

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Police Use of Force Project

Campaign Zero

Campaign Zero reviewed the use of force policies of America’s 100 largest city police departments to determine whether they include meaningful protections against police violence.

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Austin’s Big Secret: How Big Tech and Surveillance Are Increasing Policing

Grassroots Leadership

A report from Grassroots Leadership, Just Futures Law, and Mijente that documents the rise of surveillance technology use in Austin, Texas. This report looks at the relationship and links between tech companies, city projects, and increases in policing and surveillance of Austin residents. Authors analyze local policing initiatives like the Austin Regional Intelligence Center and note contracts held by local law enforcement agencies with tech companies. They also note the collaboration between local police and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and how tech companies bolster this collaboration, leading to deportations and further erosion of Austin’s Black, Latinx, and immigrant residents. The authors also present advocacy demands for this issue.

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Cameras in the Classroom: Facial Recognition Technology in Schools

Claire Galligan, Hannah Rosenfeld, Molly Kleinman, & Shobita Parthasarathy (University of Michigan)

Facial Recognition can be used to identify people in photos, videos, and in real time, and is usually framed as more efficient and accurate than other forms of identity verification. Schools have also begun to use it to track students and visitors for a range of uses, from automating attendance to school security. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that it will erode individual privacy and disproportionately burden people of color, women, people with disabilities, and trans and gender non-conforming people. In this report, authors focus on the use of Facial Recognition in schools because it is not yet widespread and because it will impact particularly vulnerable populations. On the basis of this analysis, the authors strongly recommend that use of Facial Recognition be banned in schools. They have also offered some recommendations for its development, deployment, and regulation if schools proceed to use the technology.

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Police Fired/Rehired

Washington Post

Since 2006, the nation’s largest police departments have fired at least 1,881 officers for misconduct that betrayed the public’s trust, from cheating on overtime to unjustified shootings. But The Washington Post has found that departments have been forced to reinstate more than 450 officers after appeals required by union contracts.

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