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To support and help strengthen the work of advocates and organizers, the Hub is committed to providing and uplifting up-to-date research, reports, data, model policies, toolkits and other resources. We do this by searching for, categorizing, and making available existing resources from partner organizations and others working on issues related to policing. When needed, the Hub also produces its own research in collaboration with partners. This resource database is categorized, easy to search, and regularly updated by our research team.

If you would like to suggest a resource to be included in our database, please submit it here.

Resources that appear on the Community Resource Hub website are not necessarily supported or endorsed by the Hub. The resources that appear represent various different policies, toolkits, and data that have been presented to challenge issues relevant to safety, policing, and accountability.

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Cops Don’t Stop Violence: Combating Narratives Used to Defend Police Instead of Defunding Them

Community Resource Hub for Safety & Accountability + Interrupting Criminalization

Police are facing one of the greatest crises of legitimacy in a generation. In the wake of the largest uprisings in U.S. history, sparked by police violence, bloated police budgets, and the deadly impacts of a failure to invest in community health and safety laid bare by the pandemic, pro-police forces are on the defensive. So they are reaching for one of their most reliable weapons — fear.

This is nothing new — cops and policymakers have always used fearmongering to push “law and order” agendas and pour more and more money into police departments. Now, with police budgets under scrutiny by campaigns to defund the police and refund our communities all across the country, lawmakers and the media are once again recycling old talking points about increasing violence and crime, claiming that campaigns to defund police are responsible.

Read our new report to explore data, talking points, and narratives that highlight the fact that COPS DON’T STOP VIOLENCE.

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Reimagining Traffic Safety

Community Resource Hub for Safety & Accountability

This memo explores visions, promises, and challenges surrounding efforts to remove police from traffic safety administration and management and proposes several approaches to begin rethinking traffic safety. Options include redesigning roads to make it more difficult to engage in speeding and other traffic offenses, developing alternative entities responsible for traffic safety, and developing alternative responses to traffic-related crises that do not involve the criminal legal system. Developing new approaches to traffic safety can benefit public safety on the roads while removing the deep and historic harms of police-involved traffic enforcement.

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Police in Schools: Racial Justice and True Student Safety?

American Bar Association (ABA)

The question of whether police belong in schools has been a long-debated topic in the United States. With the increased focus on policing generally, the debate has grown more intense. Proponents argue that police can more effectively address student-to-student conflict, such as bullying, and increase overall safety in an age of recurring school shootings. Those who oppose argue that police in schools contribute to the school-to-prison pipeline and result in disparities based on race and/or disability in discipline and arrests, as well as a climate of fear for students of color. Speakers on this program present the data, discuss the impact of police in schools and examine this issue critically to confront the question of whether police in schools result in enhanced student safety.

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More of the Same: Unpacking the 2022 Boston Police Budget

Data for Justice Project – ACLU Massachusetts

In May 2021, Boston’s Acting Mayor Kim Janey released her recommended City budget for the upcoming 2022 fiscal year (FY). This budget claims to double down on reducing Boston police overtime, deepening last year’s $12 million budget cut by an additional $4.9 million.

The problem? As recent ACLU analysis shows, without a simultaneous commitment to reining in the power of police unions and penalizing Boston Police Department (BPD) budgetary overages, this “cut” will simply never come to be. Taken together with the fact that Mayor Janey’s recommendation doesn’t really touch the $355 million budgeted for non-overtime policing and otherwise ignores advocates’ calls to divest from police, the FY22 BPD budget is effectively unchanged from years past.

New analysis by the ACLU of Massachusetts unpacks the Boston Police Department budget – again – making it clear that it is effectively no smaller than previous years’ budgets.

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Reducing Violence Without Police: A Review of Research Evidence

John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Researchers have conducted hundreds of studies looking for effective ways to prevent and reduce violence, but the knowledge base is far from complete, especially as it relates to one important question: are there ways to prevent violence without relying on the police? The obvious answer is “yes.” Policing has never been the primary explanation for obviously varying levels of community safety. Residents of wealthy areas do not experience the intense police surveillance and enforcement imposed on poor neighborhoods. Yet, rates of violence are reliably lower in wealthy communities.

Arnold Ventures asked the John Jay College Research and Evaluation Center (JohnJayREC) to review the research evidence for violence reduction strategies that do not rely on law enforcement. The scan was carried out by an expert group of researchers from the fields of public policy, criminology, law, public health, and social science. The members of the research group worked collaboratively to identify, translate, and summarize the most important and actionable studies.

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#NoCopAcademy Organizing Toolkit

No Cop Academy

Though the campaign ended in 2019, this organizing toolkit was developed over the past year plus by #NoCopAcademy youth and adult alumni who wanted to share out how we did what we did (because people kept asking us), to document our work, and to share it with the hundreds and thousands of young people taking action today to defund policing, get cops out of our schools, and build abolitionist futures. Campaigns are an important tool for building power, and we wanted to break down all the parts that went into ours.

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Navigating DOJ Consent Decrees in the Context of Campaigns to Defund Police

Community Resource Hub for Safety & Accountability

A fact sheet on federal consent decrees, including how they work and who the key players are, and how consent decrees related to the defund the police movement. This fact sheet also contains information on how to continue your defund campaign if your city already has a consent decree.

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From public safety to public health: Re-envisioning the goals and methods of policing

Jeremiah Goulka, Brandon del Pozo, & Leo Beletsky

As the nation grapples with defining the proper roles and limits of police generally, and particularly in Black, Brown, and other communities that have borne disproportionate harms from police (as well as from many other institutions), we propose an approach that we believe would be both realistic and effective: adopting the goals, metrics, and lenses of public health. By replacing current performance metrics with public health metrics and flawed conceptions with ones that are based upon evidence, and by demanding agility and accountability in changing practices and policies when they are shown to cause harm, we can improve the health, safety, and well-being of communities across the United States. This article sketches out the way forward and provides some illustrative examples.

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A Revenue Generation Playbook: How to Fully Fund Our Communities

Action Center on Race & the Economy + The Community Resource Hub for Safety & Accountability

This playbook outlines revenue generating options for fully funding our communities, including strategies to reduce and eliminate the bite Wall street takes out of our city budgets, that we can use to supplement our demands to defund the police (and prosecutors, jails, prisons and all carceral systems) to ensure full investment in safe, sustainable, and thriving communities: Tax the Rich and Use Progressive Revenue to Fund our Communities & Cancel Wall Street and Choose Progressive Finance.

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