Your Saved Resources Close

  • Saved resources will appear here

Resources

To support and help strengthen the work of advocates and organizers, the Hub is committed to providing and uplifting up-to-date research, reports, data, model policies, toolkits and other resources. We do this by searching for, categorizing, and making available existing resources from partner organizations and others working on issues related to policing. When needed, the Hub also produces its own research in collaboration with partners. This resource database is categorized, easy to search, and regularly updated by our research team.

If you would like to suggest a resource to be included in our database, please submit it here.

Resources that appear on the Community Resource Hub website are not necessarily supported or endorsed by the Hub. The resources that appear represent various different policies, toolkits, and data that have been presented to challenge issues relevant to safety, policing, and accountability.

Submit Your Resources

Filter Resources

Filter by Topic

Filter by Type

Showing 197 Resources Bias in Policing × Clear All

Smarter government or data-driven disaster: the algorithms helping control local communities

MuckRock & the Rutgers Institute for Information Policy & Law (RIIPL)

Governments now use the ability to collect and analyze hundreds of data points everyday to automate many of their decisions, but does handing government decisions over to algorithms save time and money? Can algorithms be fairer or less biased than human decision making? Do they make us safer? Automation and artificial intelligence could improve the notorious inefficiencies of government, and it could exacerbate existing errors in the data being used to power it.

MuckRock and the Rutgers Institute for Information Policy & Law (RIIPL) have compiled a collection of algorithms used in communities across the country to automate government decision-making. They have also compiled policies and other guiding documents local governments use to make room for the future use of algorithms.

View Resource

Police Accountability – Justice in America Podcast

Justice in America

As civilians, how do we hold the police responsible for wrongdoing? On the first episode of Season 3, Josie Duffy and co-host Darnell Moore discuss different avenues of police accountability and explain why it’s so hard for the criminal justice system to hold police accountable. They are joined by Alicia Garza, an activist, writer, and organizer, who currently serves as principal at Black Futures Lab. Alicia is a co-founder of Black Lives Matter and has been a leader in the fight against police brutality and discriminatory policing, particularly in black communities.

View Resource

Surveillance Policy Making by Procurement

Catherine Crump (University of California, Berkeley, School of Law)

In an age of heightened concern about the militarization of local police and surveillance technology, how do local law enforcement agencies obtain cutting edge and potentially intrusive surveillance equipment without elected leaders and the general public realizing it? The answer lies in the process of federal procurement, through which the federal government, often in the name of combatting terrorism, funnels billions of dollars to local law enforcement agencies that can then be used to purchase surveillance equipment. This report is the first to comprehensively consider the intersection of procurement and local surveillance policy making. Using case studies from Seattle, Oakland, and San Diego, it exposes the practice of surveillance policy making by procurement.

View Resource

Barriers to Identifying Police Misconduct – A Series on Accountability and Union Contracts by the CPCA

Chicago Coalition for Police Contracts Accountability

This is one part in a four-part series of reports on police accountability and union contracts in Chicago. The Coalition for Police Contracts Accountability (CPCA) has proposed 14 critical reforms to Chicago’s police union contracts which can have a significant impact in ending the code of silence and increasing police accountability. This report focuses on recommendations 1-4 made by the CPCA, which speak to provisions in the contracts that make it difficult to identify police misconduct.

View Resource

Conditions That Make Lying Easy – A Series on Police Accountability and Union Contracts by the CPCA

Chicago Coalition for Police Contracts Accountability

This is one part in a four-part series of reports on police accountability and union contracts in Chicago. The Coalition for Police Contracts Accountability (CPCA) has proposed 14 critical reforms to Chicago’s police union contracts which can have a significant impact in ending the code of silence and increasing police accountability. The focus of this report is on recommendations 5 and 6, which speak to provisions in the contracts that enable collusion and make it easier for officers to lie about misconduct.

View Resource

Requirements that Evidence of Misconduct be Ignored or Destroyed – A Series on Accountability and Union Contracts by the CPCA

Chicago Coalition for Police Contracts Accountability

This is one part in a four-part series of reports on police accountability and union contracts in Chicago. The Coalition for Police Contracts Accountability (CPCA) has proposed 14 critical reforms to Chicago’s police union contracts which can have a significant impact in ending the code of silence and increasing police accountability. The focus of this report is on recommendations 7, 8 and 9, which speak to the provisions in the contracts that require officials to ignore or destroy evidence of officer misconduct.

View Resource

Barriers to Investigating Police Misconduct – A Series on Accountability and Union Contracts by the CPCA

Chicago Coalition for Police Contracts Accountability

This is one part in a four-part series of reports on police accountability and union contracts in Chicago. The Coalition for Police Contracts Accountability (CPCA) has proposed 14 critical reforms to Chicago’s police union contracts which can have a significant impact in ending the code of silence and increasing police accountability. The focus of this report is on recommendations 10-13 which speak to provisions in the contracts that make it difficult to investigate and be transparent about police misconduct.

View Resource

Statistical Transparency of Policing Report Per House Bill 2355 (2017)

Oregon Criminal Justice Commission

House Bill 2355 (2017) mandated that by 2021, all Oregon law enforcement agencies must submit data regarding officer initiated traffic and pedestrian stops to the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission, so the Commission could analyze the submitted data for evidence of racial or ethnic disparities on an annual basis. To do this, the Commission, the Oregon State Police and the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) created the Oregon Statistical Transparency of Policing (STOP) Program. This is the first annual report to the Oregon Legislature by the STOP Program examining data received.

View Resource

Police Violence and Citizen Crime Reporting in the Black Community

Matthew Desmond (Harvard), Andrew V. Papachristos (Yale), David S. Kirk (University of Oxford)

High-profile cases of police violence — disproportionately experienced by black men — may present a serious threat to public safety if they lower citizen crime reporting. This report analyzes how one of Milwaukee’s most publicized cases of police violence against an unarmed black man, the beating of Frank Jude, affected police-related 911 calls, and found that residents of Milwaukee’s neighborhoods, especially residents of Black neighborhoods, were far less likely to report crime after Jude’s beating was broadcast. The effect lasted for over a year and resulted in a total net loss of approximately 22,200 calls for service. Other local and national cases of police violence against unarmed black men also had a significant impact on citizen crime reporting in Milwaukee. Police misconduct can powerfully suppress one of the most basic forms of civic engagement: calling 911 for matters of personal and public safety.

View Resource

Show more

Sign up for our weekly resource roundup