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To support and help strengthen the work of advocates and organizers, the Hub is committed to providing and uplifting up-to-date research, reports, data, model policies, toolkits and other resources. We do this by searching for, categorizing, and making available existing resources from partner organizations and others working on issues related to policing. When needed, the Hub also produces its own research in collaboration with partners. This resource database is categorized, easy to search, and regularly updated by our research team.

If you would like to suggest a resource to be included in our database, please submit it here.

Resources that appear on the Community Resource Hub website are not necessarily supported or endorsed by the Hub. The resources that appear represent various different policies, toolkits, and data that have been presented to challenge issues relevant to safety, policing, and accountability.

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Showing 253 Resources Accountability × Clear All

Unpacking the Boston Police Budget

Data for Justice Project – ACLU Massachusetts

Here in Boston, substantial pressure is building to #DefundPolice. Due to monumental organizing efforts by groups such as the Muslim Justice League and Families for Justice as Healing, the Boston City Council received an unprecedented amount of public feedback urging defunding for the June 4 hearing on external grants funding the Boston Police Department (BPD). Yet these external grants, totaling $2.6 million, are small potatoes compared to the full $414 million the City of Boston has proposed to fund the BPD in Fiscal Year 2020-2021 (FY21), and that the Boston City Council is slated to approve on Wednesday, June 10. Here the ACLU of Massachusetts presents a detailed analysis of how the Boston Police department uses its outsize share of taxpayer dollars.

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Police Foundations: A Corporate-Sponsored Threat to Democracy and Black Lives

Color of Change

Never heard of police foundations? That’s the point. Behind closed doors, police foundations and their corporate sponsors privately fund the ongoing militarization and expansion of policing – targeting Black, Brown, and Indigenous communities. Color Of Change and LittleSis have compiled the most extensive report to date of the links between police foundations and corporations, identifying over 1,200 corporate donations or executives serving as board members at 23 of the largest police foundations in the country.

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Louisville, KY: Toolkit for Confronting FOP Power via Contract Process

The 490 Project

This kit is designed to help you participate in the effort to remove dangerous provisions from the Collective Bargaining Agreements (CBA) between Louisville Metro & Louisville’s Fraternal Order of Police (FOP). This document outlines key moments in the coming weeks & months and provides you with the information you need to participate in these activities. Many of the resources here are templates that you can adapt for your own purposes.

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Whose Security is it Anyway?: A Toolkit to Address Institutional Violence in Nonprofit Organizations

Project NIA

Institutional violence within community centers, healthcare organizations, and social services, in concert with the “helping” industry’s increasing collusion with and reliance on law enforcement, fuels the prison pipeline. In response to pervasive institutional violence and increasing policing, surveillance, and targeting of queer and TGNB (trans and gender non-binary) youth of color, street-based youth, and youth experiencing homelessness, Project NIA created a toolkit to share strategies of resistance to the increased securitization of non-profit spaces.

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Evidencia la Violencia

Kilometro 0

Evidencia la violencia is a documentation tool to collect testimonies and stories in which police or public safety agents intervene in a violent, discriminatory or excessive way with the citizens. We collect these stories and data through interviews with affected people, their families or witnesses to the interventions, as well as press releases or stories on social networks. The documentation we collect feeds our database, a tool for community participation, search for accountability and public advocacy against State violence.

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Detroit’s Project Green Light and the “New Jim Code”: Why video surveillance and digital technology intensify racism

Vince Carducci for Public Seminar

Over the last three and a half years, the City of Detroit has greatly expanded Project Green Light, an initiative of the Detroit Police Department (DPD), along with local businesses and other organizations, to use video surveillance and digital technology to fight crime. Since the first cameras went live in eight gas stations on January 1, 2016, the system has grown as of April 2020 to nearly 700 locations across the city.

Though it is billed by proponents as a “real-time crime-fighting” solution, others, including the DSA, see it as a mass-surveillance system that disproportionately singles out communities of color. In particular, critics cite flaws in the technology behind the project that are part of what sociologist Ruha Benjamin, in her study Race After Technology, terms the “New Jim Code.”

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The Killer “Police Gangs” of Los Angeles

The Gravel Institute

Los Angeles, America’s second largest city, has a horrible secret. The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department – the fourth largest police department in the country – harbors dozens of criminal gangs within its ranks. These gangs have been involved in assaults, the creation of false evidence, and even murder. Now, with the help of the brave journalist Cerise Castle, the story can be told.

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Tracking Police Misconduct: How Prosecutors Can Fulfill Their Ethical Obligations and Hold the Police Accountable

Institute for Innovation in Prosecution at John Jay College

Traditionally, prosecutors do not use a centralized mechanism to track police misconduct. Instead, line prosecutors primarily share information with each other about problematic officers by word-of-mouth, and anecdotally, if at all. As a result, a prosecutor’s office that does not have a formal system to track police misconduct risks having prosecutors fail to comply with their legal obligations. To systematically track police misconduct, a growing number of prosecutors are creating internal police disclosure lists, or databases of police officers with a history of wrongdoing.

The Tracking Police Misconduct Action Guide explains why it is crucial to have a police disclosure list, and details the most important issues to consider when creating one. To produce this guide, the IIP interviewed high-ranking prosecutors throughout the country. Our hope is that upon reviewing this guide, prosecutors will develop or improve upon their own mechanisms for tracking police misconduct. By following these recommendations, prosecutors can fulfill their ethical duties and hold the police accountable, while also protecting the due process rights of police officers.

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To Protect and Observe: A History

The United States of Anxiety

Today’s viral videos of police abuse have a long political lineage. But what if one of the oldest tools of copwatching is now taken away?

Ron Wilkins takes us back to 1966, in the wake of the Watts uprising, in which he joined an early cop watch program — one that would inspire the likes of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense.

Then, reporter Jenny Casas introduces us to journalists and activists who have been using police scanners for decades to peek inside the infamously closed world of police departments. Many departments are now trying to end the practice. Special thanks to Andy Lanset and KQED for the archival tape.

And transformative justice organizer Ejeris Dixon, who is the Founding Director of Vision Change Win and editor of Beyond Survival: Strategies and Stories from the Transformative Justice Movement, joins Kai to take calls about how communities can keep themselves safe without – and from – police intervention.

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